Wednesday, July 15, 2015

From the Organization of American Historians: Frederick Jackson Turner 2016 Award


DEADLINE: SUBMISSIONS MUST BE POSTMARKED BY OCTOBER 1, 2015

The Frederick Jackson Turner Award is given annually by the Organization of American Historians to the author of a first scholarly book dealing with some aspect of American history.
The rules and terms of the competition are as follows:

Eligible books must be published during the calendar year preceding that in which the award is given;
The author may not have previously published a book-length work of history;
Submissions will be made by publishers, who may submit such books as they deem eligible;
Co-authored works are eligible, as long as neither author has previously published a book of history;
Authors who have previously co-authored a book of history are not eligible.
Each entry must be published during the period January 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015.
The award will be presented at the 2016 OAH Annual Meeting in Providence, Rhode Island, April 7–10.
Submission Procedures
One copy of each entry, clearly labeled “2016 Frederick Jackson Turner Award Entry,” must be mailed directly to the committee members listed below and must include a complete list of the author’s publications OR a statement from the publisher verifying this is the author's first book. No submission will be considered without this proof of eligibility. Each committee member must receive all submissions postmarked by October 1, 2015.
Bound page proofs may be used for books to be published after October 1, 2015 and before January 1, 2016. If a bound page proof is submitted, a bound copy of the book must be received no later than January 7, 2016. (Please see “Submission Policy” at right)
The final decision will be made by the Frederick Jackson Turner Award Committee by February 2016. The winner will be provided with details regarding the OAH Annual Meeting and awards presentation.
Frederick Jackson Turner Award Committee
Patty Limerick (Committee Chair)
Center of the American West
Macky 229/UCB 282
University of Colorado Boulder
Boulder CO 80309
Albert S. Broussard
Texas A & M University
History Department
101 Melbern Glasscock Building
College Station TX 77843-4236
Brett Rushforth
College of William & Mary
Department of History
James Blair, Room 330
250 James Blair Drive
Williamsburg VA 23185

DEADLINE: SUBMISSIONS MUST BE POSTMARKED BY OCTOBER 1, 2015
Contact Info:
K. Hamm, OAH Committee Coordinator
Organization of American Historians
112 North Bryan Avenue
Bloomington IN 47408-4141
812-855-7311

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Pacific Islanders and the American Civil War at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument.




This lecture/discussion is scheduled for the evening of July 17 at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument. Time: 6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. 

We recommend this Think Tech Hawaii interview with Justin Vance on the same subject.


History Education Hawaii strongly recommends this event. We hope to see you there!

Watch Now (You Tube Link): Why History Matters: How studying the past prepares students for the future



The results of The Nation’s Report Card: 2014 U.S. History show that many U.S. students lack a strong understanding of our nation’s history: Only 18 percent of eighth graders performed at or above Proficient on the latest NAEP assessment. 

Watch our Google Hangout (Click here) about the implications of these results and the importance of history education in helping our students to become engaged, informed, and productive citizens.













Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Teacher Workshop: September 2, 1945: Dr. Justin Vance and Dr. Mitch Yamasaki




Mojo: A Cup of History with Paul Stillwell and Daniel Martinez


Google Hangout on Why History Education Matters: Tuesday, July 7



"The results of The Nation’s Report Card: 2014 U.S. History show that many U.S. students lack a strong understanding of our nation’s history.

"The National Assessment Governing Board and the American Historical Association are co-hosting a discussion on the implications of these results and the importance of history education in helping our students to become engaged, informed, and productive citizens."


Be a part of this by going to this link. 





Alakaʻi: Traditional & Modern Leadership in Hawaiʻi

The King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center invites the public to Alakaʻi: Traditional & Modern Leadership.



Thursday, July 9, 2015 from 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

What were the qualities of a good leader in traditional Hawaiʻi? What qualities do we look for in leaders today? What are the qualities needed to lead Hawaiʻi into the future? 

Malcolm Nāea Chun shares his research on the role of aliʻi in traditional Hawaiian culture and how the qualities inherent in a good chief should play a role in Hawaiʻi as we move forward.

Brendan Burns, the grandson of the late Governor John Burns, discusses the leadership attributes associated with his grandfather, a man from humble beginnings who went on to become one of the most celebrated leaders in modern Hawaiʻi. Governor Burns displayed leadership abilities that brought commitment from supporters, commanded respect from adversaries, and led a political revolution at a time when change in Hawaiʻi was needed.

What lessons can we learn from these models of leadership?

This is a free event. RSVPs are required. (Click here).